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Delayed transfer of care days reduced by councils and NHS

Patients delayed through waiting for a care package in their own home is reducing steadily

Published on 13th August 2018

Delayed transfer of care days have been reduced further by councils and the NHS, the latest statistics for June 2018 show.

There were 139,204 days and 4,490 beds in May 2018 but this has been reduced to 134,300 total delayed days in June 2018 which is equivalent to 4,478 daily DTOC beds. In June 2017, there were 177,900 total delayed days and 5,929 beds.

Julie Ogley, Vice President of the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, said: “Despite significant pressures, our dedicated social care workforce has once again made an incredible impact, keeping delays to transfers of care lower than at this point last year.”

Of the 134,300 total delayed days in June 2018, 88,800 were in acute care which is also a decrease from June 2017, where there were 177,900 total delayed days, of which 117,100 were in acute care.

Both the NHS and social care sectors have seen reductions in the volume of delayed transfers of care in the last year. 62.6% of all delays in June 2018 were attributable to the NHS, 29.9% were attributable to social care and the remaining 7.4% were attributable to both NHS and social care.

The main reason for NHS delays in June 2018 was “Patients Awaiting further Non Acute NHS Care” which accounted for 22,800 delayed days (27.1% of all NHS delays).

The main reason for social care delays in June 2018 was “Patients Awaiting Care Package in their Own Home” which accounted for 14,600 delayed days (36.2% of all social care delays), compared to 22,100 in June 2017.

The number of delays attributable to patients awaiting a care package in their own home had been increasing steadily since April 2014 and reached a peak in December 2016. Delays attributable to this reason have been gradually decreasing since March 2017.

Julie Ogley, Vice President of the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, said tht despite the impact made, pressures facing health and social care compounded by a lack of certainty over funding, means there “is only so much dedication can do”.

“We welcome the recent investment announced for the NHS, however, as has been remarked before, investing in the health service without investing in social care is like pouring water down a sink without leaving the plug in.

“None of us want to need social care, in the same way that none of us wants to be sick, but all of us at some point will have a loved one who will depend on it or we may even need it ourselves. By kicking the social care green paper into the Autumn, the government has further delayed providing not just funding, but much-needed answers on how we are going to plan to look after us when we are older or disabled.

“With more of us living longer, the pressures on our social care system will only increase unless we put in place a long-term funding solution as soon as possible. In the meantime, it’s essential that urgent and interim funding is made available to help ease the pressures on the system and help us help the people in our care live the lives they want to live,” she concluded.

Cllr Izzi Seccombe, Chairman of the Local Government Association’s Community Wellbeing Board, added: “Councils have now reduced the average number of delayed transfers of care days attributed to social care since June 2017 by 40 per cent.

“To help reduce pressures on the NHS, adult social care needs to be put on an equal footing with the health service and councils need urgent funding to invest in effective prevention work to reduce the need for people to be admitted to hospital in the first place. This is why the LGA has launched its own adult social care green paper to kick-start a desperately-needed debate following the delay of the government’s green paper.

“To help tackle this, the government needs to address immediate pressures and plug the funding gap facing adult social care which is set to exceed £3.5 billion by 2025, just to maintain existing standards of care, while latest figures show that councils in England receive 1.8 million new requests for adult social care a year – the equivalent of nearly 5,000 a day,” she added.

Delayed transfer of care figures

 

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